Wise Witches Society

Full Moon Names and Their Meanings

The Tribal Traditions
~Esbats Rituals~
Moon Magick
Did you know that all lunar Holy-days are called Esbats, but any Wiccan ritual held at any time other than a Sabbat may be called an Esbat? I didn't, and I think most Witches call rituals performed on or around a lunar holy-day an esbat, while other rituals are simply, rituals. Due to the rotation of the earth, the Wiccan calendar contains 13 Full Moons, which means a full moon happens every 28 1/4 days. Full Moon energy is used for banishing unwanted influences, protection and divination. A Full Moon is also a good time
for planning, releasing and working backwards in time. Full Moon Magic can be done for seven days, three days before, the day of, and three days after the full moon.
The New Moon is used for personal growth, healing, the blessing of a new project etc.
Between the New Moon and Full Moon is the phase called Waxing Moon. Magick for this phase includes attraction magick, increasing, growth, and gain. Make statements on how your life should be.
Between the Full Moon and New Moon is the phase called the Waning Moon.Magic for this phase includes banishing magick, such a loosing negative emotions, bad habits etc.
Three days before the New Moon is known as the Dark Moon, as it is not visible in the sky. Traditionally, no magick is performed at this time. It is a time for rest.
Due to the rotation of the earth there are thirteen Full Moons, each carrying a traditional name.
January - Wolf Moon
February - Storm Moon
March - Chaste Moon
April - Seed Moon
May - Hare Moon
June - Dyad (pair) Moon
July - Mead Moon
August - Wyrt (green plant) Moon
September - Barley Moon
October - Blood Moon
November - Snow Moon
December - Oak Moon
Types of Rituals
Consecration of Tools
Purifying ritual to cleanse the Witches tools.
Erecting the Temple
Is done at the start of all rituals, purifies and establishes were the ritual is to take place.
Clearing the Temple
Is also performed at all rituals, disperses any energies raised during the ritual.
Sabbat Rite
Each Sabbat has it own unique style of ritual to recognise and worship the goddess and god and the turning of the wheel.
Esbat Rite
A basic ritual that can be performed at any time.
Full Moon Rite
A ritual designed to be done once a month at full moon.
Dark Moon Rite
A ritual designed to be done once a month at new or dark moon

January ~ Storm Moon
A storm is said to rage most fiercely just
before it ends, and the year usually follows suit.
February ~ Chaste Moon
The antiquated word for pure reflects the
custom of greeting the new year with a clear soul.
March ~ Seed Moon
Sowing season and symbol of the start of the new year.
April ~ Hare Moon
The sacred animal was associated in Roman legends with springtime and fertility.
May ~ Dyad Moon
The Latin word for a pair refers to the twin
stars of the constellation of Castor and Pollux.
June ~ Mead Moon
During late June and most of July the , or meadows, meads, were mowed for hay.
July ~ Wort Moon
When the sun was in Leo, the worts (from the Anglo-Saxon wyrt plant) were gathered to be dried and stored.
August ~ Barley Moon
Persephone, virgin Goddess of rebirth,
carries a sheaf of barley as a symbol of the harvest.
September ~ Blood Moon
Marking the season when domestic
animals were sacrificed for winter provisions.
Libra's full moon occasionally became the Wine Moon when a grapeharvest was expected to produce a superior vintage.
October ~ Snow Moon
Scorpio heralds the dark season when
the sun is at it's lowest and the first snows fly.
November ~ Oak Moon
The sacred tree of the Druids and the Roman
God Jupiter is most noble as it withstands winter storms.
December ~ Wolf Moon
The fearsome nocturnal animal represents the "night" of the year.
The Blue Moon ~ Variable
A Blue Moon occurs when the moon with its 28 day cycle appears twice within the same calendar month, due to that month's 31 day duration. Many consider the Blue Moon to be a goal moon where you set specific goals for yourself.
The Black Moon ~ Variable
A Black Moon occurs when there are two dark cycles of the moon in any given calendar month. It is believed that the second dark moon of a time of great power within the spiritual world and any magick worked during this time is especially powerful. right © 2004 The Celtic
Source: www.wicca.com. All rights reserved




From the Farmers Almanac
Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac's list of the full Moon names.
• Full Wolf Moon - January Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January's full Moon. Sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule. Some called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon.
• Full Snow Moon - February Since the heaviest snow usually falls during this month, native tribes of the north and east most often called February's full Moon the Full Snow Moon. Some tribes also referred to this Moon as the Full Hunger Moon, since harsh weather conditions in their areas made hunting very difficult.
• Full Worm Moon - March As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.
• Full Pink Moon - April This name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox
, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this month's celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.
• Full Flower Moon - May In most areas, flowers are abundant everywhere during this time. Thus, the name of this Moon. Other names include the Full Corn Planting Moon, or the Milk Moon.
• Full Strawberry Moon - June This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!
• The Full Buck Moon - July July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, for the reason that thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month's Moon was the Full Hay Moon.
• Full Sturgeon Moon - August The fishing tribes are given credit for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.
• Full Corn Moon - September This full moon's name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon.
• Full Harvest Moon - October This is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.
• Full Beaver Moon - November This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.
• The Full Cold Moon; or the Full Long Nights Moon - December During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low

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Become familiar with the full moon names by reading this article. Enjoy!
this is the most wonderful site in the wourld !!!!! Anyone brand new beginners could not go wrong here. There is more information, that would surely make you the Wiccan/Pagan that you want to become. I just want to thank you soooo very much for every letter of imformation that you take every second of you life to share. thanks. StormyReigns.
Be blessed !!
Stormy -
Thanks so much for your post. You are most welcome. It is members like yourself that keep me inspired to post more so it is very good for me to hear from you and know that you are getting some help and enjoyment from them.

Thanks so much for taking the time to let me know how you feel.
Blessings,
Sophia

Awesome information.   

THANKS!!!

Brightest Blessings

Lady Luna

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